Posts by Done Right Restoration

Water Damage and Basement Water Problems

Basement Water Damage Can Happen To Your Home Basement leakage is one of the most common problems found in houses. While structural damage caused by leakage is very rare, water in the basement can be a major inconvenience, and often causes damage to interior finishes and stored items. In addition, odors caused by mold, mildew, and lack of ventilation are particularly offensive to some people and can even be a source of allergic reaction. A Problem That Can Damage Your Health and Home Moisture problems in existing basements are also common, but often are not understood or properly treated. In a basement that is seldom used and separate from the living spaces above, this may not present a great problem. However, most basements in Minnesota are connected to the rest of the house through ductwork or other openings. In addition, basements are increasingly used as finished living and bedroom spaces. In these cases, moisture problems are not only annoying and uncomfortable, but can lead to significant health problems. Molds and mildew can grow in damp carpets and beneath wall coverings. Finishing a basement without first dealing with the moisture problems can result in making health conditions worse and lead to significant damage as well. Basement water problems are solvable, but there is a cost to doing it right. Solution To Moisture and Water Problems It’s a fact: Water damage can happen after just 48 hours. Act fast or drywall water damage, carpet water damage, leaky basements and home water damage can happen. We know as you do, that the safety of your family is your highest concern. Moisture can cause illness-causing mold and also damage materials you want to store or use in your basements. A wet basement is unlivable, unhealthy, and a hazard. If you have a house flood, you need to get the water out of your home right away. You need comprehensive water damage and water damage restoration services from a trained Minnesota Water Damage Restoration Expert. There are companies especially trained and equipped to extract water out of water damaged homes quickly, so that it won’t damage the structure itself. They also use special tools and techniques to dry up the house so that it won’t become a breeding ground for mold and other bacterial growth.  ...

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Water Damage Mold and Your Home

Water Damage and Mold For significant mold growth to occur, there must be a source of water (which could be invisible humidity), a source of food, and a substrate capable of sustaining growth. Common building materials, such as plywood, drywall, furring strips, carpets, and carpet padding are food for molds. In carpet, invisible dust is the food source. After a single incident of water damage occurs in a building, molds grow inside walls and then become dormant until a subsequent incident of high humidity; this illustrates how mold can appear to be a sudden problem, long after a previous flood or water incident that did not produce a mold-related problem. The Right Conditions The right conditions re-activate mold. Studies also show that mycotoxin levels are perceptibly higher in buildings that have once had a water incident Both our indoor and outdoor environment have mold spores present. There is no such thing as a mold free environment in the Earth’s biosphere. Spores needs three things to grow into mold: (1) Nutrients: Food for spores in an indoor environment is organic matter, often cellulose. (2) Moisture Moisture is required to begin the decaying process caused by the mold. (3) Time: Mold growth begins between 24 hours and 10 days from the provision of the growing conditions. There is no way to date mold. Mold colonies can grow inside building structures. The main problem with the presence of mold in buildings is the inhalation of mycotoxins. Molds may produce an identifiable smell. Growth is fostered by moisture. After a flood or major leak, mycotoxin levels are higher in the building even after it has dried out (source: CMHC). Food sources for molds in buildings include cellulose-based materials, such as wood, cardboard, and the paper facing on both sides of drywall, and all other kinds of organic matter, such as soap, dust and fabrics. Carpet contains dust made of organic matter such as skin cells. If a house has mold, the moisture may be from the basement or crawl space, a leaking roof, or a leak in plumbing pipes behind the walls. Insufficient ventilation can further enable moisture build-up. The more people in a space, the more humidity builds up. This is from normal breathing and perspiring. Visible mold colonies may form where ventilation is poorest, and on perimeter walls, because they are coolest, thus closest to the dew point. If there are mold problems in a house only during certain times of the year, then it is probably either too air-tight, or too drafty. Mold problems occur in airtight homes more frequently in the warmer months (when humidity reaches high levels inside the house, and moisture is trapped), and occur in drafty homes more frequently in the colder months (when warm air escapes from the living area into unconditioned space, and condenses). If a house is humidified artificially during the winter, this can create conditions favorable to mold. Moving air may prevent mold from growing since it has the same desiccating effect as lowering humidity. Minnesota Water and Flood Restoration Expert There are many ways to prevent mold growth. A Minnesota Water and Flood Restoration Expert is capable of repairing the damage – usually by removing the affected areas and eliminating the cause of the excess moisture with state of the art equipment and experience. Industrial pumps will remove the water quickly and efficiently. High velocity fans will dry the area in no time at all. Experience counts when dealing with mold, mildew, fungus and water that might be contaminated will keep you and your family...

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Water Damage Cleanup and Your Health

Water Damage and Mold – The Hidden Dangers Autumn means molds are out in full force. Outdoor molds thrive in gutters, soil, rotten wood and fallen leaves. Damp weather promotes indoor mold growth as well. Check bathrooms, kitchens, basements, carpets and houseplants for mold growth. Allergic reactions may be heightened by the airborne spores molds produce. Molds, mildew and fungi are present everywhere…inside and outside. Furniture, carpet, books, even the air we breathe is full of spores. Humid, dark places with little air circulation promote the rapid growth of these fungi. Hidden Dangers of Mold Eating, relaxing and sleeping in a home full of allergy antagonists like mold, mildew and fungus presents your body with additional challenges which may lead to a worsening of your symptoms. Over 50 molds are considered problematic, including Stachybotrys, more commonly known as “black mold”. Pulmonary hemosiderosis has been linked to toxic mold exposure by the CDC. Mold can grow behind walls and even dead molds can make you sick. Mold can be found in homes, hospitals, schools and office buildings and may not be easily noticeable. All parts of the country are affected by mold and areas where moisture or heavy rain prevails, are more susceptible to mold, mildew and fungal growth. Mold Causes and Symptoms Molds typically grow in homes and buildings affected by water damage and are a potential cause of many health problems including asthma, sinusitis, and infections. People sensitive to molds are particularly uncomfortable on cloudy, rainy, damp days. Molds may also play a major role in cases of sick building syndrome and related illnesses. Allergic reactions can be caused by molds. The most reliable physical findings of mold allergy are dyshidrotic eczema, accompanied by tiny blisters on the palms of the hands. Other symptoms are nummular eczema that looks like ringworm. “I don’t SEE any mold!” Half of the people who call say those very words. But not all mold problems are as obvious as we would like them to be. In fact, the most costly mold related repairs are caused by mold that no one knew was there. Unnoticed, mold can rapidly spread exponentially inside walls, under floors, above ceilings, and deep into heating and air conditioning vents. By the time hidden mold is detected, it can cause thousands of dollars in property damage and pose significant health risks. Immediate Water Damage Cleanup The thing you need to fight water damage and flooding is to hire a professional water damage restoration company. A Minnesota Water Damage Restoration Expert utilizes state of the art equipment in removing as much water as possible, and then begins drying the area with our high velocity fans and ventilation systems. They can restore a healthy environment to your home or office if you happen to find yourself up an indoor creek without a paddle. Moisture and its effects in your house or office can cause a lot of harm, like the growth of mildew and mold, and dry rot, and if not cared for it can carry with it seriously large problems if not met fast and skillfully extracted. Any drying being done must be Done Right to see to it that there aren’t any environments which promote and allow hazardous materials to flourish, taking your home or business and turning it into an problematic one that will only get bigger if not cared for....

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Mold and Hidden Water Damage

Mold From Ongoing Minor or Hidden Water Damage Virtually everyone has some type of mold or another somewhere in their home. Although not all types are toxic, it is sometimes difficult to distinguish types without lab testing. Black molds can develop from water intrusion like water seepage, improper drainage and irrigation, plumbing leaks, rain and condensation issues. While toxic mold is less common than other mold species, it is not rare. For that reason, it is imperative to treat and remove all molds as if they are potentially harmful. Regardless of the type of mold found, a home containing mold is essentially not a healthy home. Exterior Water Intrusion Mold can grow on any wet building materials. Once it is discovered, it must be addressed quickly and appropriately. Delayed or improper treatment of mold issues can multiply repair costs significantly. When building materials such as wood siding, brick, concrete block and stucco are exposed to moisture sources from outdoors, over time that moisture can penetrate exterior walls and enter the wall cavity, creating perfect conditions for mold growth in between exterior and interior walls. Eventually the moisture and mold can penetrate all the way through to the interior side of wall surfaces. By that time, extensive damage to the structure has already taken place. Water and Mold Cleanup and Repair Begin any cleanup by drying your home, including removing any water-damaged items to help facilitate drying. Water-damaged walls and floorboards will need to be thoroughly dried, and drywall will likely have to be thrown away. All wet insulation, carpet, and similar items will also have to be thrown away. If you are cleaning personal items, there will be some hard choices to make. Cloth materials can normally be cleaned by laundering them several times to remove the impact of the water. Many other porous items, such as couches, stuffed animals, papers, and some older pictures, will have to be thrown away if they have been in the water for longer than 48 hours. Remember, it is better to throw something away than have it become a source of mold in the future. The long-term health issues associated with mold can be reduced by ensuring that a proper cleanup is done.  If you suspect you have a mold problem from hidden water damage, it is always best to hire a qualified and experienced specialist that is knowledgeable in the latest water extraction and drying methods. If your home was flooded for longer than 48 hours, you will probably need to consult a Certified (IICRC) Water Damage Restoration Professional. A proper inspection can help detect water intrusion issues early, saving thousands of dollars in repairs costs. Some of this information was quoted from an article called “Is Indoor Mold Contamination a Threat to Health?” by Harriet M. Ammann, Ph.D., D.A.B.T. – Senior Toxicologist at Washington State Department of Health, Olympia, Washington. Is Indoor Mold Contamination a Threat to Health.pdf Download Or for a full copy of her report in Microsoft Word format CLICK...

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Water Damage and Your Health

Can Moisture and Water Damage To Your Home Be Hazardous to Your Health? Mother Nature has proven year after year that havoc can occur at a split second. Tens of thousands of building structures across the country have suffered moisture/water damage as a result of severe weather (acts of God) or just plain bad luck. Water damage to a home or building can occur in many ways. Even the most solidly built and well-maintained home or building can be damaged by a violent force of nature, such as a flood, hurricane, tornado, or wildfire.  Water Damage To Your Home In other situations, a water pipe may burst, and air conditioning leak, moisture intrusion, backed up septic tank or sewer line, or a sump pump may malfunction while you’re away on vacation and do serious water damage to your home and possessions. Understanding the categories of moisture/water damage is the first step in getting your home or building back to normal conditions. Categorizing the level of contamination of water in a damaged structure is required to perform loss assessment and evaluation activities. The category of water contamination must be considered so the correct procedures can be established for processing water-damaged structures and materials. Water damage is divided into three general categories:   1) Category 1 – Clean Water 2) Category 2 – Gray Water 3) Category 3 – Black Water However, the category of water contamination should not be identified solely by the color of the water, but by the source, contents, history and characteristics of the water. Category 1– Clean water originates from a source that does not pose substantial harm to humans if the cleanup is performed within 24 hours of occurrence. Clean water sources may include, but are not limited to, broken water supply lines, melting ice or snow, falling rainwater, broken toilet tanks and toilet bowls that do not contain contaminants or additives. Clean water that has contact with structural surfaces and content materials may deteriorate in cleanliness as it dissolves or mixes with soils and other contaminants, and as time elapses. Category 2– Gray water contains a significant level of contamination and has the potential to cause discomfort or sickness if consumed by or exposed to humans. Gray water carries microorganisms and nutrients for microorganisms. Examples of gray water sources may include, but are not necessarily limited to, discharge from dishwashers or washing machines, overflows from washing machines, overflows from toilet bowls with some urine (no feces), sump pump failures, seepage due to hydrostatic pressure, broken aquariums and punctured water beds. Gray water may contain chemicals, bio-contaminants (fungal, bacterial, viral, algae) and other forms of contamination including physical hazards. Time and temperature aggravate Category 2 water contamination levels significantly. Gray water in flooded structures that remains untreated for longer those 48 hours may change to Category 3. Category 3– Black water contains pathogenic agents and is grossly unsanitary. Any persons with compromised immune systems, respiratory problems or allergies, or who are under 2 years of age or elderly must remain off the job site until the building is judged safe for occupancy. Black water includes sewage and other contaminated water sources entering or affecting the indoor environment. Toilet backflows that originate from beyond the toilet trap is considered black water contamination, regardless of visible content or color. Category 3 water includes all forms of flooding from seawater, ground surface water and rising water from rivers or streams. Such water sources carry silt and organic matter into structures that create black water conditions. The water is considered to be Category 3 water in situations where structural...

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